CNC Laser

Continuing on my thoughts about woodworking, I was looking at laser engraved wood and CNC machines. Here are a couple of DIY videos from YouTube.

There is a company here in Eugene which specializes in this.

Here is a DIY project page: http://davidegironi.blogspot.it/2014/07/38mm-x-38mm-laser-engraver-build-using.html
http://www.aliexpress.com/item/PCB-milling-machine-CNC-2020B-DIY-cnc-wood-carving-machine-mini-engraving-machine-3050114A/32428314987.html

It also seems that andrio or bananna pi are also used. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Banana_Pi

Life drainers…

I have been struggling for the last few months with an addiction... an IKEA addiction. An addition that I am not sure I was completely responsible for creating, but more on that later.

It is a habit which, I really had to learn the hard way, that I needed to kick. Here is my problem: Their product line has a really powerful draw. Their products all look like they fit together (with each other). This gives the impression of harmony. Meanwhile many of their products look like they are minimalistic in design. That is, they are smooth and sexy and and visually simplistic. I say look minimalistic, because most of the products from IKEA have a well designed (short) life span. That is, the products simply do not last beyond the first intended use - and this is by design. The way I understand the product is that in the IKEA business model, the products are not what create the business money, rather it is the service of distributing the products which is viewed as the money maker. So, the business metrics are set up as: "How many products do I distribute?", not "How products do I sell?". While both metics are important, The first puts an importance on the distribution, the second puts an emphasis on the monetary value of the sale, or the value of a lasting product (value presented to the customer). This is why I suggest that the IKEA product's life cycle is also designed. I have had to learn that the hard way. I like the look, but beyond that "IKEA life" seems to be designed to bring the customer into a consumer relationship with IKEA, such that the customer must buy multiple products due to short life spans. Consider the difference between the IKEA Expedit series and their KALLAX series (several differences are exposited well by Peter Robinson). Expedit was a series with solid construction and a production run of several decades. However, The Expedit product had a fantastic secondary market because they lasted and were hearty. The Expedit series was replaced by KALLAX. A less hearty, physically lighter product series.

Consider the following review from YouTube.

From a management perspective, IKEA has applied design principles not only to the product but also to the acquisition process and to the life cycle of the product. They have put new design requirements on the life span, causing a redesign of the product. In a way, this de-emphasizes the product and elevates the need for service mechanism of delivering the product - The service has been assessed and re-designed. For a good book about applying these principals to your business read: Service Design Thinking. Or for a quick check Service Design look at Wikipedia.

My distain for IKEA rivals my distain for Facebook. They also have an interesting product, but one is never sure where the platform is going. This makes the product life span (as a user understands it) quite susceptible to uncertainty. Apple products could also be similarly considered to have gone through this design phase. Consider when Apple started soldering RAM to the motherboard (because their secondary market has been limited by making certain parts "non-upgradable").

I have been plotting my escape from life drainers. This means that I need to be able to find solutions elsewhere with other products. I think I found my solution to the IKEA wormhole on a DIY site or two: http://www.ana-white.com , and http://designsbystudioc.com.

There are several projects I have been looking at doing. One is a shoe rack for my front door area. These sites were a good place to get ideas and example plans - to see how things go together. Another project in progress is a coffee table on casters for my living room.

Shoe Racks

http://www.ana-white.com/2011/01/shoe-dresser
http://www.ana-white.com/2011/06/shoe-organizer
http://www.ana-white.com/2015/08/free_plans/grandy-sliding-door-console
http://www.ana-white.com/2015/02/free_plans/wall-cubby-crate-shelves
http://www.ana-white.com/2011/03/entry-shoe-bench
http://www.ana-white.com/2012/07/big-crate-shoe-box-test-bri-wax
http://fixthisbuildthat.com/adjustable-shoe-storage-bench/
http://www.ana-white.com/2013/04/shoe-bench
http://www.ana-white.com/2011/08/shoe-cabinet-aka-my-kitchens-best-friend

Coffee Table

http://designsbystudioc.com/diy-plans-build-westport-coffee-table/
http://www.ana-white.com/2013/01/plans/chalkboard-produce-crate
http://www.ana-white.com/2010/09/vintage-crate-carts.html
http://www.ana-white.com/2011/08/shoe-crates
http://www.ana-white.com/2010/03/plans-simple-spa-bench-inpsired-by.html

Dinning room table

http://www.ana-white.com/2015/07/free_plans/2x4-truss-benches-alaska-lake-cabin
http://www.ana-white.com/2015/07/free_plans/2x4-truss-table-alaska-lake-cabin

Laundry Basket solution

http://www.ana-white.com/2011/01/sausha%E2%80%99s-washerdryer-pedestals

kitchen Ideas

http://www.ana-white.com/2015/12/free_plans/diy-apothecary-style-kitchen-cabinets

Other Stuff

http://fixthisbuildthat.com/diy-wooden-drink-coasters-plans/

Some interesting links about Apple and design:
http://www.jnd.org/dn.mss/apples_products_are.html
http://www.idgconnect.com/abstract/10261/design-guru-don-norman-slams-apple-ease-disservice
http://www.fastcodesign.com/3053406/how-apple-is-giving-design-a-bad-name
http://www.theverge.com/2015/11/16/9743996/apple-designer-interview-bruce-tog-tognazzini-don-norman
These are here because I talk about Apple designing the life cycle of their products. I don't link to them because they are not a major thrust of this post.

And Also a Playground

So, if I am going to do a shed in the front yard, then a playground should fit there too.

What kind of plans or ideas are out there, that I can draw from?

Here is a list of links with some helpful materials:

http://www.detailedplay.com/SwingsetPlans.htm

http://www.toolcrib.com/blog/2009/03/25-free-backyard-playground-plans-for-kids-playsets-swingsets-teeter-totters-and-more
http://www.totalplaygrounds.com/blog/28-free-diy-playset-plans/#diy
http://www.moneycrashers.com/build-wooden-outdoor-kids-playground-equipment/
http://www.ericsoutdoorfurniture.com/705-princes-exercise-station-play-set
http://www.maeshedandplayground.com/collections/accessories/products/air-pogo
http://lasgd.blogspot.com/2015/02/10-x-8-pent-shed-plans-gable-roof.html

Shed:
http://www.motherearthnews.com/diy/garden-yard/garden-shed-plans-zm0z11zgri.aspx
http://www.thegreenden.co.uk/products/playground-storage-shed/
http://www.popularmechanics.com/home/how-to-plans/how-to/a178/1276536/
http://www.todaysplans.net/free-storage-shed-plans.html
http://www.shed-plans.biz/
http://freebies.about.com/od/homegardenfreebies/tp/free-shed-plans.htm
http://www.woodworkersworkshop.com/resources/index.php?search=FREE%2010%20X%2012%20SHED%20PLANS
http://shedas.blogspot.com/2015/03/5x7-shed-plan-info.html

Homemade shop-vac dust collector

I started looking at some homemade shop-vac projects.First I did some googling, then I searched YouTube.
I found that there are different ideas and terms covering the shop-vac solution space.

The two most informative videos I found were:

Some of the basic questions I am asking are: which shop-vac should I get and how should I evaluate other options? There are people who do review shop-vacs. And I found that C.F.M. measures are really the most important. I also learned that if one adds a cyclone dust separator to the shop-vac that the filter stays much cleaner. The next question is how should I make a cyclone dust separator?

There are several interesting projects which I found. The guys in the video had some really good solutions too, including a $15 cyclone, and blast gates which can be purchase on Amazon.com. I also found the following interesting homemade solutions:

  • http://lumberjocks.com/projects/19069
  • http://www.woodturnersresource.com/extras/projects/cyclone/Cyclone.html
  • http://home.comcast.net/~prestondrake/Stuff_Workshop_Cyclone.htm

Blast Gates:

  • http://www.homemadetools.net/blast-gates
  • http://lumberjocks.com/topics/41990
  • http://www.woodworkingtips.com/etips/etip020726ws.html

Silence: around the shop-vac
A Noise block around the vacuum.

Building Wooden Trains

The potential to build my own wooden trains as recently been observed. That is, the idea does not seem soooo far fetched any more now that I own a router and a router table. Towards that end I have started to amass some ideas and some links. Some additional thoughts are that I could use a CNC machine. I would like to make my own CNC machine. To that end I have started another post about ideas for building my own CNC machine.

Some places to order router bits:

A second way to approach this would be to use a tool like a CNC Shark. This has a lot of appeal for replication of items. However, at nearly $4K (at Rockler) that is a lot to start out with. Better to get some experience first. Learn where I can source my supplies from etc.

Some plans for cutting track:

Tutorials on how to make curved track:

Some Places to get components for rolling stock or rolling stock:

Some places to learn about child safe paints:

Some places to order manufactured sets

Some places to get a custom branding tool or wood etcher to sign the pieces I make.

Accessories:

  • Wooden Train tables
  • Research Parts